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Dao the Chinese cat

Balancing life

Dao the Chinese cat

Vaccine sarcoma scare

April 24th, 2015 · 3 Comments · Uncategorized

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We went back to Fitzpatrick yesterday. Mui needs her chemo check up( Mui is our other cat who unfortunately diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and currently on chemo) on her blood counts. And I decided Dao is going in as well as I discovered a lump between his shoulder blade.

Dao had his vaccination just 1 month ago, and if I discovered the lump at that time,  I would have told our local vet then. however, if I didn’t it means it had develop since the vaccination. Did you ever since the amputation or any medicial situation you went to the Internet and basically read everyone on there? Yup, that’s me.  And based on the location of the lump, I suspected it can be a sarcoma and brought dao with me, squeezing in for a X-ray check up and asking for some opinions.

Nick (our oncologist ) came to see us, and examine Dao. He thinks it is in the wrong skin layer for a sarcoma and think it might be a reaction to the vaccine. He took some sample and sent it off to the lab for some results. We shal hear next week.

I know many readers might or might not be relying on the chemo after a cancer diagnosis, maybe is the money. Maybe we just didn’t want our beloved to go through a hard time. I did think whether I did the right thing bringing Dao there, it is not easy. First with 2 cats , and to put them through a 3 hour journey.  But nothing better being reassure that it is ok. So I took the decision and took them back. The good thing was, Dao accompanied Mui and they share the same pad when they were admitted, it helped Mui to calm down a lot. Is nice to see such little touch by the clinic.

How much is anyone willing to pay for their cats treatment? I used to think I’m going to be sensible. But it is very hard when you just want to know they are ok. The vet bill is piling up now, and we used up our insurance  allowance (on Mui). We didn’t insure Dao and even he’s insured, he has super long list of exclusions added to it (we tried) making him not favourable for any claims. 

Dao did climb on my lap during the driving, and I had him in one arm and the other on my wheels (bad bad bad). He is so cute when he just need a hug

bad cat who needs mommy cuddle while driving


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3 Comments so far ↓

  • kazann

    I’m sorry to hear you are concerned about a vaccine associated sarcoma (VAS). My cat lost her leg due to VAS and she will never have a vaccine again.

    It’s still not clear from your blog what type of tumour Dao had in his leg but it’s advised that cats and dogs should not have vaccines if they have cancer, see this blog here: http://nutrition.tripawds.com/2014/02/24/vaccinations-after-a-dog-or-cat-cancer-diagnosis/

    Your vet is not following vaccine protocols. Vaccines must NEVER be injected in the scruff. Too many vets give too many vaccines too often and in the wrong locations. You might want to find a new vet who follows the most up-to-date protocols.

    I know you are doing what you believe is best for Dao and following what your vet advises and that’s what makes it so difficult for us. We believe the “expert” but they sometimes do what is best for them. Vets who give vaccines in the scruff do so because they are afraid they will get bitten. If they are afraid of a bite then they should develop their technique or get out of the business.

    I hope Dao is okay and continues to thrive as a tripawd. Hoping for the best.

    Kerren

    • dreve

      thanks for leaving a comment. Dao has osteosarcoma in his right hind legs close to pelvis. We did not know now to vaccine. What prompts me to vaccine was because our other cat, Mui Chu (meaning Miss Piggy) was originally diagnosed with Lymphoma, which can be associated with FLV+, so I thought is best to vaccine him just in case. Luckily now, that little lump seems to disappeared after they took some samples (at least I can’t find it). He had some itchy moments when he came home after the visit but it was fine now.
      I really appreciated your comments, Mui (whom has pancreatic cancer) is not vaccinated for over 1 year, because I was away and we simply forgot. We discovered she has problems when I took her for a health check and vaccination last month

  • kazann

    I’m sorry to hear you have two ill cats. Generally the feline leukemia vaccine is not considered necessary except in the case where a cat is at risk. It sounds like Dao is at risk if Mui Chi has feline leukemia. Probably the best person to advise you on necessary vaccines and schedules for both cats would be the oncologist.

    These days it’s recommended that vaccines should not be given any more often than 3 year intervals. A leading animal immunologist in the US only vaccinates his pets every 7 years. I did not know any of this until after my cat got cancer from her last vaccine a year earlier. Those who have cats with VAS become very strident about vaccines. I think it’s because we feel guilty for vaccinating our cats to keep them safe only to find out we have given them cancer. Most of us did not know the risks.

    I’m so happy to hear Dao’s lump has disappeared. It sounds like it was only an inflammation which some cats can get after a vaccine.

    It’s great that Dao is getting around so well after his hydrotherapy. He is a darling fellow!

    Kerren and Tripawd Mona

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